Hall-Sullivan House – Revisited (Original Post January 31, 2014)

The Hall-Sullivan House, 7128 Euclid Avenue.
The Hall-Sullivan House, 7128 Euclid Avenue.

Built in 1892, at 7128 Euclid Avenue, the Hall-Sullivan House became home to Cleveland banker Corliss E. Sullivan, the youngest of three children of Jeremiah J. and Selina Sullivan. The younger Sullivan went on to become chairman of the board of the Central National Bank, the bank founded by his father.

The advent of property tax, the pollution of the steel mills in Cleveland’s industrial flats and, the rising cost to heat and to maintain the mansions that lined Millionaire’s Row resulted in many of their owners moving further east into smaller homes on smaller pieces of land. Corliss and Selina Sullivan moved to Hunting Valley. In 1935, an addition was made to the rear of the mansion, including an auditorium to seat 200, and was dedicated as the Sons of Italy Lodge. For many years the property served as Coliseum Entertainment Center. The property is for sale, and I recently had the opportunity to photograph the interior.

The Hall-Sullivan House, 7128 Euclid Avenue.
The Hall-Sullivan House, 7128 Euclid Avenue.
The Hall-Sullivan House, 7128 Euclid Avenue.
The Hall-Sullivan House, 7128 Euclid Avenue.
Interior of the Hall-Sullivan House, 7128 Euclid Avenue.
Interior of the Hall-Sullivan House, 7128 Euclid Avenue.
Interior of the Hall-Sullivan House, 7128 Euclid Avenue.
Interior of the Hall-Sullivan House, 7128 Euclid Avenue.
Sons of Italy Auditorium.
Sons of Italy Auditorium.
Sons of Italy Auditorium.
Sons of Italy Auditorium.
Sons of Italy Auditorium.
Entrance to Sons of Italy Auditorium.

Leisy Brewing Company

The Leisy Brewing Company was established by Iowa brewer Isaac Leisy and his brothers August and Henry, when they purchased Cleveland’s Frederick Haltnorth Brewery. Isaac had come to Cleveland in June of 1873 to attend the Brewers Congress, and purchased the brewery the following month. Located at 3400 Vega Avenue on Cleveland’s near west side, Leisy Brewing Company earned a reputation for high quality. It became Cleveland’s largest independent brewery, and was the city’s oldest brewer, and one of the longest surviving family-owned breweries in the nation when it closed in 1959.

Isaac Leisey’s mansion, built in 1892, located just east of the brewery was demolished in 1974. The 1882 building, now home to a paper recycling plant, is largely demolished. The 1917 building at 3506 Vega, the home of Downing Exhibits, from 1972 to 2000, is currently under renovation as the future home of Gypsy Brewing.

Leisy Brewery, 3504 Vega Avenue (south and east elevations).
Leisy Brewery, 3504 Vega Avenue (south and east elevations at Fulton Avenue).
Leisy Brewery, 3504 Vega Avenue (west elevation).
Leisy Brewery, 3504 Vega Avenue (west elevation seen from Train Avenue).
Leisy Brewery, 3504 Vega Avenue (north elevation).
Leisy Brewery, 3504 Vega Avenue (north elevation as seen from beneath the Fulton Avenue overpass on Train Avenue).
Remaining exterior north wall from beneath West 35th Street overpass.
Remaining exterior north wall from beneath Fulton Avenue overpass on Train Avenue.
Inside the Leisy Brewery 1917 building.
Inside the Leisy Brewery 1917 building.
Inside the Leisy Brewery loading dock 1917 building.
Inside the Leisy Brewery loading dock 1917 building.
Roof-top view of light shafts.
Roof-top view of light shafts.
Graffiti inside light shaft.
Graffiti inside light shaft.
Graffiti inside Leisy Brewery 1917 building.
Graffiti inside Leisy Brewery 1917 building.
Graffiti inside Leisy Brewery 1917 building.
Graffiti inside Leisy Brewery 1917 building.
Unidentified building immediately east of location of Leisy Mansion thought to be a part of the Leisy estate.
Unidentified building immediately east of location of Leisy Mansion thought to be a part of the Leisy estate (at the intersection of Vega Avenue and West 32nd Street.

 

 

Complete black and white gallery                                  Complete color gallery

Joseph & Feiss Company

The Joseph and Feiss Company was founded in 1841 as Koch and Loeb, a general store in Meadville, Pennsylvania. The company moved to Cleveland, Ohio, in 1845, opening a store on Superior Avenue, just off Public Square, where they sold a general line of men’s and boys clothing, and piece goods which they sold to tailors. Other partners joined the company, including Jacob Goldsmith and Julius Feiss in 1865 and Moritz Joseph in 1873.

In 1897, Goldsmith, Joseph, Feiss & Company opened a factory to produce ready-made men’s clothing under the Clothcraft label. The company changed its name to the Joseph and Feiss Company in 1907, and was incorporated in 1920 when it moved into its new factory on W. 53rd Street in Cleveland. Joseph & Feiss merged with Phillips-Van Heusen Corp. in 1966, and was acquired by Hugo Boss AG, a West German clothier in 1989. Once employing more than 1,800 workers, the company closed its factory on West 53rd Street in 1997, relocating its 450 employees to a modern building in near-by Brooklyn, Ohio. After staving-off closing in 2010, the plant employing 170 workers again faced closure in April, 2015, but the plant was sold to New York-based W Diamond Group.

After many years of abandon, and plans to repurpose the warehouse building as apartments, the former Joseph & Feiss facility off of West 53rd Street, south of I-90, has been purchased by the Menlo Park Academy. Menlo Park Academy, a partner in the Cleveland Metropolitan School District/Charter School collaborative, will repurpose the former warehouse building and relocate its charter school for gifted students in time for the opening of the 2016-17 school year.

Former Joseph & Feiss Company Offices
Former Joseph & Feiss Company Offices
Former Joseph & Feiss Warehouse
Former Joseph & Feiss Warehouse
Inside the former warehouse
Inside the former warehouse
Inside the former warehouse
Inside the former warehouse
Inside the former warehouse
Inside the former warehouse
Inside the former warehouse
Inside the former warehouse
Inside the former warehouse
Inside the former warehouse
Inside the former warehouse
Inside the former warehouse
Inside the former warehouse
Inside the former warehouse
On the roof of the former warehouse
On the roof of the former warehouse
From inside the former warehouse
From inside the former warehouse
Abandoned behind the office building
Abandoned behind the office building

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